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  • Prosperity in the pipeline for oil company

    Introduction

    Angola’s fast developing oil industry required a partner with the resources to supply and process large volumes of line pipe. Tata Steel stepped up to the mark whilst also delivering sustainable economic benefits to local communities.

    Detailed Information

    Summary

    Summary

    • Pipe shipped

      2,500 lengths of 12m pipe shipped from Hartlepool to Angola

    • Resource building

      Up to 40 pipes processed each day

    • Jobs created

      200 jobs created, from logistics to labourers

    • Regional benefits

      Regional economy boosted as natural resources were developed

     

    While the Malongo project was challenging in a number of aspects, all those involved pulled together and made the project a success. We have learned a lot from working in Angola with Socotherm and this will be applied in other projects we take on across the globe.

    Geoff Cheetham, Contracts and Logistics Manager, Tata Steel


    Introduction

    Angola is firmly established as a global hub of the hydrocarbon industry, with conservative estimates putting the country’s oil reserves at around 10 billion barrels.

    Tata Steel’s contract for the Malongo Terminal Oil Export Pipeline project (MTOE) involved highly efficient production and delivery of line pipe, as well as setting up a concrete coating plant in the West African nation of Angola.

    The challenge

    Fulfilling this order required Tata Steel to work collaboratively with Socotherm Angola to install the country’s first concrete weight coating facility.

    This ambitious project was an integral part of a broader contract involving the supply, coating and shipment of substantial volumes of line pipe and related equipment to the offshore lay contractor.

    The solution

    A partnership was formed to develop the Malongo Terminal Oil Export Pipeline project (MTOE) in Block 0 concession at water depths ranging from 100 to 120 feet. The pipeline was used to export two crude oil blends from an existing jetty at the shoreline to two new deep water loading berths.

    The product

    • 32.5km 36” (914mm) outside diameter Grade B submerged arc welded (SAW) steel line pipe
    • 32.5km 42” (1067mm) outside diameter grade X52 SAW steel line pipe
    • External fusion bonded epoxy (FBE) anti-corrosion coating
    • Concrete weight coating
    • Supply and installation of 112 bracelet aluminium alloy anodes on the offshore line pipe
    • Twenty-six 42” OD induction bends (12 with FBE coating)
    • One 42” OD FBE/Splashtron™ coated riser pipe (jetty riser section with splash zone protection)

    Challenge

    Challenge

    The Malongo Terminal Oil Export Pipeline project (MTOE), involved not only the production and delivery of line pipe, but also the setting up of a concrete coating plant in the West African country of Angola.

    Today, 90% of Angola’s export revenues are generated by the country’s substantial oil reserves, estimated at around 10 billion barrels.

    Driving local economic growth

    In order to drive economic development, many companies are setting up in-country operations, using local resources and labour to stimulate regional growth, ease logistical issues and strengthen relations.

    Ensuring the highest health and safety standards were maintained throughout the project was of the utmost importance. With the plant operating on two-day shifts, 200 jobs were created, including:

    • Logistics workers
    • Labourers
    • Plant operators
    • Inspection staff

    Ensuring health and safety for local workers

    This diverse range of positions meant a wide variety and high level of training was necessary. This involved:

    • Rigorous training inductions for every employee
    • ‘Toolbox talks’ to educate staff in creating and maintaining a safer working environment

    Managing shipping and transport issues

    The new plant was situated on land being reclaimed from the sea, adjacent to the port area. As the road infrastructure was still being redeveloped following a civil war, shipping was the most widely used method for importing components and materials. This meant:

    • The port was extremely busy, with a limited number of berths
    • Each shipment had to be carefully planned to ensure the project went ahead with minimal delay

    Many materials required for the plant construction and concrete coating were not available locally, creating a need to work with the customer and suppliers to ensure goods could pass as easily as possible through customs.

    Meeting concrete coating challenges

    Concrete coating pipes can often prove complex. In Angola, there were additional challenges such as:

    • Dealing with Luanda’s heat and humidity which affects the moisture content of concrete
    • Effectively managing the curing process and ensuring the demanding specifications were met 

    Solution

    Solution

    As a leading steel producer, Tata Steel capitalised on decades of experience, expert knowledge and global capabilities to deliver a pipeline solution for a challenging and complex project.

    Tata Steel worked in partnership with a number of major players in the oil and gas sector, including:

    • Cabinda Gulf Oil Company (CABGOC), a Chevron affiliate
    • Sonangol
    • Total
    • ENI

    Making a difference to Luanda’s economy

    Working in partnership with Socotherm Angola, Tata Steel developed the Malongo Terminal Oil Export Pipeline project (MTOE). Located in water depths ranging from 100 to 120 feet, the pipeline is designed to export two crude oil blends from an existing jetty to two new deep water loading berths.

    Tata Steel also worked with Socotherm Angola to install the country’s first concrete weight coating facility in Luanda. Socotherm had recently constructed a new anti-corrosion and thermal insulation plant, so adding concrete coating capabilities was an operationally logical add-on.

    Working efficiently with Socotherm, Tata Steel produced a high integrity coated product. The in-country coating also boosted the regional economy, as natural resources were developed to provide key products, such as cement.

    Working together to deliver success

    Constructing the plant was an integral part of Tata Steel’s wider contract that required the supply, coating and shipment of substantial volumes of line pipe and associated equipment to the offshore lay contractor. This involved:

    • Shipping 2,500 lengths of 12m FBE coated pipe, each weighing seven tonnes, from Hartlepool port to Angola
    • Tata Steel maritime experts working with local employees to establish pipe-handling procedures for large diameter pipes
    • An average of between 35 and 40 pipes going through the plant each day
    • Each pipe coated with 3” or 3.5” of concrete, reinforced with wire mesh, which increased the weight to between 18 and 20 tonnes

    The pipes, ranging in length from 11 to 13 metres, were then individually transported from the plant to the quay area and loaded onto cargo barges, which in turn delivered them to the lay barge. 

    Summary

    • Pipe shipped

      2,500 lengths of 12m pipe shipped from Hartlepool to Angola

    • Resource building

      Up to 40 pipes processed each day

    • Jobs created

      200 jobs created, from logistics to labourers

    • Regional benefits

      Regional economy boosted as natural resources were developed

     

    While the Malongo project was challenging in a number of aspects, all those involved pulled together and made the project a success. We have learned a lot from working in Angola with Socotherm and this will be applied in other projects we take on across the globe.

    Geoff Cheetham, Contracts and Logistics Manager, Tata Steel


    Introduction

    Angola is firmly established as a global hub of the hydrocarbon industry, with conservative estimates putting the country’s oil reserves at around 10 billion barrels.

    Tata Steel’s contract for the Malongo Terminal Oil Export Pipeline project (MTOE) involved highly efficient production and delivery of line pipe, as well as setting up a concrete coating plant in the West African nation of Angola.

    The challenge

    Fulfilling this order required Tata Steel to work collaboratively with Socotherm Angola to install the country’s first concrete weight coating facility.

    This ambitious project was an integral part of a broader contract involving the supply, coating and shipment of substantial volumes of line pipe and related equipment to the offshore lay contractor.

    The solution

    A partnership was formed to develop the Malongo Terminal Oil Export Pipeline project (MTOE) in Block 0 concession at water depths ranging from 100 to 120 feet. The pipeline was used to export two crude oil blends from an existing jetty at the shoreline to two new deep water loading berths.

    The product

    • 32.5km 36” (914mm) outside diameter Grade B submerged arc welded (SAW) steel line pipe
    • 32.5km 42” (1067mm) outside diameter grade X52 SAW steel line pipe
    • External fusion bonded epoxy (FBE) anti-corrosion coating
    • Concrete weight coating
    • Supply and installation of 112 bracelet aluminium alloy anodes on the offshore line pipe
    • Twenty-six 42” OD induction bends (12 with FBE coating)
    • One 42” OD FBE/Splashtron™ coated riser pipe (jetty riser section with splash zone protection)

    Challenge

    The Malongo Terminal Oil Export Pipeline project (MTOE), involved not only the production and delivery of line pipe, but also the setting up of a concrete coating plant in the West African country of Angola.

    Today, 90% of Angola’s export revenues are generated by the country’s substantial oil reserves, estimated at around 10 billion barrels.

    Driving local economic growth

    In order to drive economic development, many companies are setting up in-country operations, using local resources and labour to stimulate regional growth, ease logistical issues and strengthen relations.

    Ensuring the highest health and safety standards were maintained throughout the project was of the utmost importance. With the plant operating on two-day shifts, 200 jobs were created, including:

    • Logistics workers
    • Labourers
    • Plant operators
    • Inspection staff

    Ensuring health and safety for local workers

    This diverse range of positions meant a wide variety and high level of training was necessary. This involved:

    • Rigorous training inductions for every employee
    • ‘Toolbox talks’ to educate staff in creating and maintaining a safer working environment

    Managing shipping and transport issues

    The new plant was situated on land being reclaimed from the sea, adjacent to the port area. As the road infrastructure was still being redeveloped following a civil war, shipping was the most widely used method for importing components and materials. This meant:

    • The port was extremely busy, with a limited number of berths
    • Each shipment had to be carefully planned to ensure the project went ahead with minimal delay

    Many materials required for the plant construction and concrete coating were not available locally, creating a need to work with the customer and suppliers to ensure goods could pass as easily as possible through customs.

    Meeting concrete coating challenges

    Concrete coating pipes can often prove complex. In Angola, there were additional challenges such as:

    • Dealing with Luanda’s heat and humidity which affects the moisture content of concrete
    • Effectively managing the curing process and ensuring the demanding specifications were met 

    Solution

    As a leading steel producer, Tata Steel capitalised on decades of experience, expert knowledge and global capabilities to deliver a pipeline solution for a challenging and complex project.

    Tata Steel worked in partnership with a number of major players in the oil and gas sector, including:

    • Cabinda Gulf Oil Company (CABGOC), a Chevron affiliate
    • Sonangol
    • Total
    • ENI

    Making a difference to Luanda’s economy

    Working in partnership with Socotherm Angola, Tata Steel developed the Malongo Terminal Oil Export Pipeline project (MTOE). Located in water depths ranging from 100 to 120 feet, the pipeline is designed to export two crude oil blends from an existing jetty to two new deep water loading berths.

    Tata Steel also worked with Socotherm Angola to install the country’s first concrete weight coating facility in Luanda. Socotherm had recently constructed a new anti-corrosion and thermal insulation plant, so adding concrete coating capabilities was an operationally logical add-on.

    Working efficiently with Socotherm, Tata Steel produced a high integrity coated product. The in-country coating also boosted the regional economy, as natural resources were developed to provide key products, such as cement.

    Working together to deliver success

    Constructing the plant was an integral part of Tata Steel’s wider contract that required the supply, coating and shipment of substantial volumes of line pipe and associated equipment to the offshore lay contractor. This involved:

    • Shipping 2,500 lengths of 12m FBE coated pipe, each weighing seven tonnes, from Hartlepool port to Angola
    • Tata Steel maritime experts working with local employees to establish pipe-handling procedures for large diameter pipes
    • An average of between 35 and 40 pipes going through the plant each day
    • Each pipe coated with 3” or 3.5” of concrete, reinforced with wire mesh, which increased the weight to between 18 and 20 tonnes

    The pipes, ranging in length from 11 to 13 metres, were then individually transported from the plant to the quay area and loaded onto cargo barges, which in turn delivered them to the lay barge. 

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