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    Here, you can find out more about our locations across the UK. We have sites throughout the UK, and you can find out more about what each region has to offer by selecting one of the tabs below.

    Take some time to explore the area that’s of interest to you and discover its key towns and cities.

    You’ll also find plenty of practical information (travel times, transport, property and schools).

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    South Wales has a proud heritage in steel, dating back more than a hundred years. The region is home to our Port Talbot, Llanwern, Trostre and Orb sites. The steel made by Tata in South Wales makes its way into a dazzling array of end products, from cars to construction machinery, from the Millennium Stadium to filing cabinets and fridges.

    Our Port Talbot and Llanwern sites are part of the Tata Steel Strip Products UK Business, which makes hot-rolled, cold-rolled and metallic-coated strip steels. The integrated steelmaking sites use imported ore and coal to produce up to 3.5 million tonnes of hot rolled and cold rolled annealed in steel coils per annum, for a variety of different end uses.

    Port Talbot

    Port Talbot is located in Neath Port Talbot, in West Glamorgan. The town is built along the eastern rim of Swansea Bay in a narrow strip of coastal plain surrounding the River Afan estuary; local beaches include Aberafon Sands and Morfa Beach. Swansea is visible on the opposite side of Swansea Bay. A significant regeneration programme is underway in Port Talbot, bringing a new look and new life to the town centre and docks, which includes new homes, offices, light industry, retail developments and improvements to the railway station.

    Llanwern

    Llanwern is situated in the eastern fringe of the city of Newport, in South East Wales, which played an important part in the Industrial Revolution due to its rich natural resources of coal and iron ore. The community of Llanwern has a population of just 333 and the western section of the Llanwern Steelworks is an integral part of this close-knit community.

    Trostre

    Trostre is part of the Tata Steel Packaging business. Tata Steel Packaging, a leading manufacturer of high quality packaging steels, supplies the can-making industry worldwide and also produces steel for non-packaging applications. Trostre Works is situated in Pemberton, east of Llanelli in Carmarthenshire, Wales. Although Pemberton itself is a suburban area, it is part of the Llanelli Rural community bordering Llanelli and the villages of Llwynhendy, Dafen and Bryn.

    Orb

    At Orb, we manufacture a variety of specialist products, ranging from electrical steels to be used in power transformers to silicon steels for all sizes of rotating machines. The Orb Works are located in Newport, a cathedral and university city in south east Wales. Newport is located on the River Usk close to its confluence with the Severn estuary, approximately 12 miles northeast of Cardiff. The 2011 census revealed Newport to be the third largest city in Wales, with a city population of 145,700 and an urban population of 306,844. Although Newport includes some surrounding rural areas, it is the largest urban area within the historic county boundaries of Monmouthshire and the preserved county of Gwent.

    The region

    South Wales is bordered by England and the Bristol Channel to the east and south, and by mid Wales and west Wales to the north and west. The region contains almost three-quarters of the population of Wales, including the capital city of Cardiff (population approximately 350,000), as well as Swansea and Newport, with populations approximately 240,000 and 150,000 respectively.

    The South Wales region includes the historic counties of Glamorgan and Monmouthshire, plus Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire. Although the region is heavily industrialised, large swathes of this green and pleasant land remain unspoiled. Areas including the upper Neath valley, the Vale of Glamorgan and the valleys of the River Usk and River Wye remain distinctly beautiful and have been designated Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). Many heavily industrialised sites have since reverted to wilderness and these, along with the region’s lush forests and open moorland, have led to the area being recognised as the perfect place for outdoor pursuits including cycling, walking, climbing and other outdoor activities. The Brecon Beacons National Park covers about a third of South Wales, containing Pen y Fan, the highest mountain south of Snowdonia. Click here to discover more

    Nearby places

    Cardiff is the capital city of Wales. As the country’s commercial and cultural centre, it is also the most popular visitor destination in Wales with 19.53 million visitors in 2014. Over the last fifteen to twenty years, Cardiff has enjoyed significant investment in its infrastructure and amenities. A new waterfront area at Cardiff Bay contains the Senedd building, home to the Welsh Assembly and the Wales Millennium Centre arts complex. Current developments include the continuation of the redevelopment of the Cardiff Bay and city centre areas with projects such as the Cardiff International Sports Village, a BBC drama village, and a new business district in the city centre. The city is also famous for sports including rugby union, cricket, football and athletics and has twice been awarded European City of Sport status (2009 and 2014).

    Swansea, situated on the sandy South West Wales coast, is the second largest city in Wales after Cardiff. The county of Swansea includes the Gower Peninsula, famed for its glorious beaches. Rhossili Bay is the first beach to be awarded ‘Britain’s Best Beach’ by TripAdvisors Travellers’ Choice for the second year running, not to mention being designated the 3rd best beach in Europe and 9th best in the world! Away from the golden sands, the area also boasts the Lliw uplands which are mainly open moorland, reaching the foothills of the Black Mountain. The city of Swansea is modern and bustling with a thriving cultural life and excellent shopping, including the largest covered market in Wales.

    Llanelli is the largest town in both the county of Carmarthenshire and the county of Dyfed, Wales. It sits on the Loughor estuary on the West Wales coast, approximately 10 miles west-northwest of Swansea and 12 miles south-east of Carmarthen. Llanelli is increasingly being recognised as a leisure and tourism destination, with many ongoing developments such as the new Llanelli Scarlets rugby stadium, the Old Castle Works leisure village and a National Hunt racecourse at Ffos Las near Trimsaran. Llanelli Waterside is also currently undergoing a significant programme of redevelopment, in a joint venture between Carmarthenshire County Council and the Welsh Assembly Government.

    Travel distances 

    Site

    Cardiff

    Swansea

    Llanelli

    Port Talbot

    Car: 42 min

    Car: 23 min

    Car: 23 min

    Llanwern

    Car: 30 min

    Car: 1 hour 4 min

    Car: 1 hour 16 min

    Trostre

    Car: 1 hour 6 min

    Car: 25 min

    Car: 7 min

    Orb

    Car: 28 min

    Car: 1 hour 2 min

    Car: 1 hour 14 min


     

    Transport

    Neath Port Talbot Station is served by First Great Western and Arriva.

    Newport Station is currently served by three train operating companies: Arriva, CrossCountry and First Great Western.

    Llanelli Station is located on the West Wales Line and the Heart of Wales Line. The station, and the majority of trains calling at it, are operated by Arriva Trains Wales.

    Property

    Port Talbot Sales
    Port Talbot Rentals

    Llanwern Sales
    Llanwern Rentals

    Pembrokeshire (Trostre) Sales
    Pembrokeshire (Trostre) Rentals

    Newport (Orb) Sales
    Newport (Orb) Rentals

    Schools

    Port Talbot
    Newport (Llanwern/Orb)
    Pembrokeshire (Trostre)

    The North West is home to our Shotton site, which manufactures organic coated metals for roofing and cladding systems, consumer products, as well as specialty and niche products.  Shotton is well-known as the location of Tata Steel Colors, an international business with nearly 50 years’ experience in the development and manufacture of these pre-finished steels.

    Shotton

    Shotton is located in Flintshire, close to the border between England and North Wales. It’s predominantly a rural area, but the town grew around the success of the coal industry in the eighteenth century and later became an industry centre for steel works. Our site in Shotton is just five miles from Chester, and also within easy reach of Wrexham, which is the biggest town in North Wales. The bustling cities of Liverpool and Manchester are also near by, so there’s great access to some of the region’s historic and contemporary centres.

    North Wales is a region of extraordinary beauty, which includes dramatic coastlines, soaring mountains, tranquil forests and lush, green hills. The region’s beaches and walks are amongst the best in the country and the area is also home to many magnificent castles. Attractions such as the World Heritage Site Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, the hillsides and forests of Clwydian Range (a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty), Bodelwyddan Castle and the medieval town of Ruthin are within easy reach of Shotton. Click here to discover more

    Nearby places

    Wrexham sits close to the English and Welsh border set against the backdrop of the Welsh mountains and the lower Dee Valley. It’s a busy and bustling town and a major centre in the region’s administrative, commercial, retail and educational infrastructure. It offers excellent shopping facilities, from modern retail parks to more traditional markets.

    Chester lies on the River Dee and is home to around 118,000 people. It’s a place where the historic and the modern sit side by side and in 2013 it beat Rome, Paris and Venice in a poll of Europe’s prettiest cities. Originally founded as a Roman city, its medieval walls are the best preserved in the country. Its Roman Amphitheatre, with a capacity of 7000, is England’s largest whilst Chester Cathedral is the North West’s most visited attraction. The city has unique retail facilities with Chester’s Rows; double level covered shopping walkways on all four main streets. Chester Zoo is the UK’s largest zoo and is a great attraction for families. Pubs, bars and nightclubs are spread throughout the city, many housed within its iconic black-and-white medieval buildings. 

    Travel distances

    Site

    Chester

    Wrexham

    Liverpool

    Manchester

    Shotton

    Car: 27 min

    Car: 34 min

     

    Car: 39 min

    Train: 1h 4min

    Car: 1h

    Train: 1h 17min



    Transport

    Shotton Railway Station is situated where the Borderlands Line crosses the North Wales Coast Line. Arriva Trains Wales manages the services (click here to find out more).

    Chester train station has services to Wales (Llandudno, Holyhead, Cardiff) as well as Manchester, Liverpool, London and Milton Keynes.

    Property

    Shotton Sales
    Shotton Rentals

    Chester Sales
    Chester Rentals

    Wrexham Sales
    Wrexham Rental 

    Schools

    Deeside schools
    Cheshire West and Chester schools
    Wrexham schools

    The East Midlands has long been a focal point for steel manufacturing. Even as far back as Roman times, the local area was mined for iron ore. Today, Tata has a site in Corby, near Northampton. The first steel was produced here in October 1935 and Corby has been known for steel production ever since.

    Corby

    Our Corby site manufactures a wide variety of steel tubes. The site is one of Europe's leading manufacturers of hot finished, cold formed welded steel tubular products, structural hollow sections, large diameter pipe and many more.

    The town itself is perfectly positioned, right in the heart of England. The surrounding area is known as Rockingham Forest which was originally a Royal Hunting Ground. So it is an area of greenery and natural beauty, along with a great sense of history and heritage. As well as the stately homes and manors that dot the local area, Corby itself dates back to the 8th Century. There is evidence of Roman, Anglo-Saxon and Danish settlements.

    Corby was often called the largest town in England not to have a railway station – but that tag no longer applies. Corby Train Station was officially opened in 2009 and trains run to London St. Pancras every hour. Within the town, the main centre has enjoyed major investment in recent years, transforming it into a bustling, modern shopping area.

    Corby sits in the centre of a triangle formed by Leicester, Peterborough and Northampton, while the nearest major city is Birmingham. Kettering, Market Harborough and Wellingborough are Corby’s closest neighbours, all of a similar size.

    Nearby places

    Slightly further away lies Northampton. Northampton is one of the largest towns in the UK, with a thriving sports and leisure scene. The local rugby union team is Northampton Saints, while the town also has a professional football team and a county cricket club. Silverstone Racing Circuit, current home of the British Grand Prix, is also just a few miles outside of the town. Northampton has enjoyed rapid expansion in recent decades, which has seen major redevelopments to the town centre and shopping areas.

    Travel further still and you will reach the city of Leicester. Leicester is one of the UK’s oldest cities and in the modern day, also one of the most diverse. It has two universities as well as established Asian, Polish, Ugandan, Somali and Irish communities. It is estimated that around 70 different languages are spoken in Leicester and it is thought that Diwali celebrations in the city are the largest outside of the Indian sub-continent.

    Travel distances

    Site

    Leicester

    Northampton

    Market Harborough

    Corby

    Car: 49 min

    Car: 43 min

    Car: 16 min


    Transport

    Trains run from Corby to London St. Pancras every hour, usually stopping at Kettering, Wellingborough, Bedford and Luton. You can also travel as far as Melton Mowbray in the other direction. Click here to find out more

    Property

    Corby Sales
    Corby Rentals

    Northampton Sales
    Northampton Rentals

    Leicester Sales
    Leicester Rentals

     

    Schools

    Corby schools
    Northamptonshire schools
    Leicester schools

    Tata is growing and investing in the West Midlands.

    Our main site is in Wednesfield in Wolverhampton, where we have recently completed a series of investments to strengthen the site’s position as the UK’s largest steel processing centre. We also have sites in Walsall and Wednesbury. In each location, our aim is to create state-of-the-art, specialist sites where steel products can be produced in the optimum conditions. 

    University of Warwick, Coventry

    Our Research and Development function is located in the University of Warwick Science Park, in Coventry. Here we work closely with our customers and a global team of researchers to design and test new products and proceses, developing innovative solutions that meet the ever-changing demands of industry and technology.

    You’ll also discover that the thriving urban centre of Coventry is within easy reach. Home to both Coventry University and the University of Warwick it’s a busy and buzzing town centre with plenty of nightlife, retail and culture to enjoy. The Warwick Arts Centre found on the University of Warwick campus is the largest UK arts centre to be found outside of London. And the Belgrade Theatre, which benefitted from a recent refurbishment offers a diverse range of drama, dance and other live events. It’s a historic city, with no less than three cathedrals, including the world famous St Michael’s cathedral, which was constructed in the 1950s to replace the original building that had been destroyed in the bombing raids of World War II. Warwick Castle is a hugely popular tourist attraction and offers a great location for a day out, as does Kenilworth Castle, well known for its walks, Tudor gardens and various themed events. Other venues of historical interest include the Coventry Transport Museum, which is home to the largest collection of British transport in the world. Transport remains an important focus for Coventry and Warwickshire and it’s estimated that 10% of all UK automotive jobs are located in the area. Key employers include Jaguar Land Rover, Aston Martin, Peugeot Citroen, Rolls Royce and BMW. And of course, Tata Steel. The regional economy places a great deal of value on research and development and on average each firm in Coventry and Warwickshire spends more than double on R & D compared to elsewhere in the UK.

    Wednesfield

    The Steelpark site in Wednesfield has 14,000 m2 of warehousing for stocking and processing black bar. It also boasts a heated high-bay warehouse and racking for over 2,300 product specifications and up to 5,000 tonnes of high-value bright bar. Tata makes bright bar at Wednesbury and produces narrow coated strip in Walsall.  The site is also home to a large Distribution centre, which has an Automotive Service Centre, Slitting Centre, Light Gauge and Profiling Centre and employs around 600 employees

    Wednesfield is located in Wolverhampton and is best known for its thriving market. Although it is a village with plenty of history, it is also a modern place to live and work. It now has a wide array of shopping and leisure facilities, although Wolverhampton itself remains the hub of commercial and retail activity in the area.

    Walsall

    Walsall has always been a manufacturing town. Over the years, it has been most famous for its leather-makers and it is also a place with lots of leisure activities. Walsall has two museums and an art gallery, along with many bars, clubs, theatres and outdoor activities.

    Wednesbury

    Our other site in the West Midlands is located in Wednesbury, which is near Walsall and Wolverhampton. All three sites are well-connected to transport and, at the heart of the UK, they offer lots of opportunity to explore the surrounding areas and further afield.

    Nearby places

    Travel through the West Midlands and you will reach Britain’s second largest city – Birmingham. More people live in Birmingham than any other British city outside of London and the city is now a major international centre for business and an important transport, retail and conferencing hub. It also boasts a busy international airport. Within Birmingham itself, there is a wealth of cultural opportunities. The city has its own Royal Symphony Orchestra, Royal Ballet and Repertory Theatre – as well as six universities adding to a city with an already diverse population. The diversity of Birmingham is perhaps best reflected in its food. Birmingham is famous as the place where the Balti dish originated. The Balti is now a world-renowned dish, although Birmingham is still recognised as its authentic home.

    The region known as the West Midlands is geographically diverse. It borders Wales in the West and includes Staffordshire in the North, which means that there are no less than five Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty within the region: the Cotswolds, the Wye Valley, the Shropshire Hills, the Malvern Hills and Cannock Chase. However, due to its industrial heritage, the area is still known colloquially as ‘The Black Country’ – despite its very varied landscape.

    Metalworking has been important here from as early as the 16th century. Around this time, the thickest seam of iron ore and coal in Great Britain was discovered. The seam was nine metres thick, and its discovery fuelled rapid growth and prosperity in the West Midlands and beyond. At the same time, the West Midlands is famous for more than simply industry. It is home to the world famous Cadbury brand, created in Bournville. Farther afield, you can reach Warwick and Stratford-Upon-Avon, both historic towns with plenty to offer visitors. 

    Travel distances

    Site

    Wolverhampton

    Birmingham

    Coventry

    Walsall

    Car: 24 mins

    Car: 21 mins

    Car: 50 mins

    Coventry

    Car: 1 h 15 mins

    Car: 52 mins

    Car: 0 mins

    Wednesfield

    Car: 10 mins

    Car: 26 mins

    Car: 55 mins

    Wednesbury

    Car: 21 mins

    Car: 23 min

    Car: 43 mins

     

    Transport

    Walsall All train services through Walsall are operated by London Midland.

    Wednesfield and Wednesbury do not have a train station. Arriva runs regular bus services run to: Wolverhampton and Birmingham.

    Canley station is the closest to the R&D offices in Coventry (University of Warwick Science Park) being just 15 minute walk away. Coventry station is a 20 minute drive away.

     

    Property

    Walsall Sales
    Walsall Rentals

    Coventry Sales
    Coventry Rentals

    Wednesfield Sales
    Wednesfield Rentals

    Wednesbury Sales
    Wednesbury Rentals

    Schools

    Walsall schools
    Coventry schools
    Wednesfield schools
    Wednesbury schools

    In 1850, a rich seam of iron ore was discovered in the hills around Middlesbrough. Many iron works were quickly established and, for a time, Middlesbrough was nicknamed ‘Ironopolis’ while the River Tees became ‘Steel River’. Times change, but steel manufacturing is still integral to the region’s economy and Tata has important sites in Teesside and Hartlepool. 

    Hartlepool

    Hartlepool sits on the North Sea coast andis home to part of our Tubes business, one of Europe's leading manufacturers of hot finished, cold formed welded steel tubular products, structural hollow sections, large diameter pipe and many more. Steel from Tubes has been used in a wide variety of products ranging from lampposts and signposts to the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff and St Pancras Station in London. Tubes products have also been used in a diverse array of countries throughout the world from the Pepsi Max Big One in Blackpool to Ulster University in Northern Ireland and the Skyplaza International Airport in Hong Kong. As a town, Hartlepool has benefitted from significant investment during the 1990s, creating new housing, revitalising the waterfront and building a new, attractive marina in place of the former harbour and industrial shipyards.

    The wider North East region is home to three large conurbations: Teesside, Wearside, and Tyneside. There are only three cities in the region; Newcastle upon Tyne is the largest city in the region with a population of just under 280,000 followed by Sunderland, both of which are located in the metropolitan county of Tyne and Wear. The city of Durham is the county town of County Durham. More broadly, the region offers lots of opportunities to discover the North of England, Scotland and it is also close to many parts of mainland Europe across the North Sea, including Holland, Belgium and Scandinavia.

    Nearby places

    Durham is a beautiful and historic city, located on the River Wear to the north of Darlington. Durham is well known for its Norman cathedral and 11th century castle, both designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986. The castle has been the home of Durham University since 1832.

    Since the mid-1980s Sunderland has undergone massive regeneration,particularly around the central business district and the river corridor. New business investment has increased prosperity and, as in Middlesbrough, former shipyards and quaysides have been transformed into luxury residential blocks, city centre commercial developments and leisure facilities, as well as a major marina development. More recently, the east-end of the city has seen the implementation of huge regeneration plans, with new cafes, bars, restaurants and landscaped gardens.

    Newcastle is one of the most vibrant cities in the UK, with a city centre admired as much for its architecture as for its night-life. Newcastle successfully blends picturesque, neoclassical architecture and mediaeval streets with technology, business and innovation. The UK's first biotechnology village, the "Centre for Life" is located in the city centre close to the Central Station, while the traditional quayside has been transformed and is now home to major cultural developments in Gateshead, including the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, the venue for the Turner Prize 2011, and the Norman Foster-designed The Sage Gateshead music centre. Around every corner in Newcastle, there is something new to discover.

    Travel distances

    Site

    Middlesbrough

    Sunderland

    Newcastle

    Hartlepool

    Car: 24 mins

    Car: 32 mins

    Car: 44 mins

     

    Transport

    Hartlepool train station sits between Newcastle and Middlesbrough and is also served by Northern Rail.

     

    Property

    Hartlepool Sales
    Hartlepool Rentals

     

    Schools

    Hartlepool schools


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    As well as our manufacturing sites throughout the UK, Tata Steel also has teams located in Glasgow and London. Glasgow is home to our Pensions function and Tata Group roles are based in our Millbank offices in London.

    South Wales

    South Wales has a proud heritage in steel, dating back more than a hundred years. The region is home to our Port Talbot, Llanwern, Trostre and Orb sites. The steel made by Tata in South Wales makes its way into a dazzling array of end products, from cars to construction machinery, from the Millennium Stadium to filing cabinets and fridges.

    Our Port Talbot and Llanwern sites are part of the Tata Steel Strip Products UK Business, which makes hot-rolled, cold-rolled and metallic-coated strip steels. The integrated steelmaking sites use imported ore and coal to produce up to 3.5 million tonnes of hot rolled and cold rolled annealed in steel coils per annum, for a variety of different end uses.

    Port Talbot

    Port Talbot is located in Neath Port Talbot, in West Glamorgan. The town is built along the eastern rim of Swansea Bay in a narrow strip of coastal plain surrounding the River Afan estuary; local beaches include Aberafon Sands and Morfa Beach. Swansea is visible on the opposite side of Swansea Bay. A significant regeneration programme is underway in Port Talbot, bringing a new look and new life to the town centre and docks, which includes new homes, offices, light industry, retail developments and improvements to the railway station.

    Llanwern

    Llanwern is situated in the eastern fringe of the city of Newport, in South East Wales, which played an important part in the Industrial Revolution due to its rich natural resources of coal and iron ore. The community of Llanwern has a population of just 333 and the western section of the Llanwern Steelworks is an integral part of this close-knit community.

    Trostre

    Trostre is part of the Tata Steel Packaging business. Tata Steel Packaging, a leading manufacturer of high quality packaging steels, supplies the can-making industry worldwide and also produces steel for non-packaging applications. Trostre Works is situated in Pemberton, east of Llanelli in Carmarthenshire, Wales. Although Pemberton itself is a suburban area, it is part of the Llanelli Rural community bordering Llanelli and the villages of Llwynhendy, Dafen and Bryn.

    Orb

    At Orb, we manufacture a variety of specialist products, ranging from electrical steels to be used in power transformers to silicon steels for all sizes of rotating machines. The Orb Works are located in Newport, a cathedral and university city in south east Wales. Newport is located on the River Usk close to its confluence with the Severn estuary, approximately 12 miles northeast of Cardiff. The 2011 census revealed Newport to be the third largest city in Wales, with a city population of 145,700 and an urban population of 306,844. Although Newport includes some surrounding rural areas, it is the largest urban area within the historic county boundaries of Monmouthshire and the preserved county of Gwent.

    The region

    South Wales is bordered by England and the Bristol Channel to the east and south, and by mid Wales and west Wales to the north and west. The region contains almost three-quarters of the population of Wales, including the capital city of Cardiff (population approximately 350,000), as well as Swansea and Newport, with populations approximately 240,000 and 150,000 respectively.

    The South Wales region includes the historic counties of Glamorgan and Monmouthshire, plus Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire. Although the region is heavily industrialised, large swathes of this green and pleasant land remain unspoiled. Areas including the upper Neath valley, the Vale of Glamorgan and the valleys of the River Usk and River Wye remain distinctly beautiful and have been designated Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). Many heavily industrialised sites have since reverted to wilderness and these, along with the region’s lush forests and open moorland, have led to the area being recognised as the perfect place for outdoor pursuits including cycling, walking, climbing and other outdoor activities. The Brecon Beacons National Park covers about a third of South Wales, containing Pen y Fan, the highest mountain south of Snowdonia. Click here to discover more

    Nearby places

    Cardiff is the capital city of Wales. As the country’s commercial and cultural centre, it is also the most popular visitor destination in Wales with 19.53 million visitors in 2014. Over the last fifteen to twenty years, Cardiff has enjoyed significant investment in its infrastructure and amenities. A new waterfront area at Cardiff Bay contains the Senedd building, home to the Welsh Assembly and the Wales Millennium Centre arts complex. Current developments include the continuation of the redevelopment of the Cardiff Bay and city centre areas with projects such as the Cardiff International Sports Village, a BBC drama village, and a new business district in the city centre. The city is also famous for sports including rugby union, cricket, football and athletics and has twice been awarded European City of Sport status (2009 and 2014).

    Swansea, situated on the sandy South West Wales coast, is the second largest city in Wales after Cardiff. The county of Swansea includes the Gower Peninsula, famed for its glorious beaches. Rhossili Bay is the first beach to be awarded ‘Britain’s Best Beach’ by TripAdvisors Travellers’ Choice for the second year running, not to mention being designated the 3rd best beach in Europe and 9th best in the world! Away from the golden sands, the area also boasts the Lliw uplands which are mainly open moorland, reaching the foothills of the Black Mountain. The city of Swansea is modern and bustling with a thriving cultural life and excellent shopping, including the largest covered market in Wales.

    Llanelli is the largest town in both the county of Carmarthenshire and the county of Dyfed, Wales. It sits on the Loughor estuary on the West Wales coast, approximately 10 miles west-northwest of Swansea and 12 miles south-east of Carmarthen. Llanelli is increasingly being recognised as a leisure and tourism destination, with many ongoing developments such as the new Llanelli Scarlets rugby stadium, the Old Castle Works leisure village and a National Hunt racecourse at Ffos Las near Trimsaran. Llanelli Waterside is also currently undergoing a significant programme of redevelopment, in a joint venture between Carmarthenshire County Council and the Welsh Assembly Government.

    Travel distances 

    Site

    Cardiff

    Swansea

    Llanelli

    Port Talbot

    Car: 42 min

    Car: 23 min

    Car: 23 min

    Llanwern

    Car: 30 min

    Car: 1 hour 4 min

    Car: 1 hour 16 min

    Trostre

    Car: 1 hour 6 min

    Car: 25 min

    Car: 7 min

    Orb

    Car: 28 min

    Car: 1 hour 2 min

    Car: 1 hour 14 min


     

    Transport

    Neath Port Talbot Station is served by First Great Western and Arriva.

    Newport Station is currently served by three train operating companies: Arriva, CrossCountry and First Great Western.

    Llanelli Station is located on the West Wales Line and the Heart of Wales Line. The station, and the majority of trains calling at it, are operated by Arriva Trains Wales.

    Property

    Port Talbot Sales
    Port Talbot Rentals

    Llanwern Sales
    Llanwern Rentals

    Pembrokeshire (Trostre) Sales
    Pembrokeshire (Trostre) Rentals

    Newport (Orb) Sales
    Newport (Orb) Rentals

    Schools

    Port Talbot
    Newport (Llanwern/Orb)
    Pembrokeshire (Trostre)

    North West and North Wales

    The North West is home to our Shotton site, which manufactures organic coated metals for roofing and cladding systems, consumer products, as well as specialty and niche products.  Shotton is well-known as the location of Tata Steel Colors, an international business with nearly 50 years’ experience in the development and manufacture of these pre-finished steels.

    Shotton

    Shotton is located in Flintshire, close to the border between England and North Wales. It’s predominantly a rural area, but the town grew around the success of the coal industry in the eighteenth century and later became an industry centre for steel works. Our site in Shotton is just five miles from Chester, and also within easy reach of Wrexham, which is the biggest town in North Wales. The bustling cities of Liverpool and Manchester are also near by, so there’s great access to some of the region’s historic and contemporary centres.

    North Wales is a region of extraordinary beauty, which includes dramatic coastlines, soaring mountains, tranquil forests and lush, green hills. The region’s beaches and walks are amongst the best in the country and the area is also home to many magnificent castles. Attractions such as the World Heritage Site Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, the hillsides and forests of Clwydian Range (a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty), Bodelwyddan Castle and the medieval town of Ruthin are within easy reach of Shotton. Click here to discover more

    Nearby places

    Wrexham sits close to the English and Welsh border set against the backdrop of the Welsh mountains and the lower Dee Valley. It’s a busy and bustling town and a major centre in the region’s administrative, commercial, retail and educational infrastructure. It offers excellent shopping facilities, from modern retail parks to more traditional markets.

    Chester lies on the River Dee and is home to around 118,000 people. It’s a place where the historic and the modern sit side by side and in 2013 it beat Rome, Paris and Venice in a poll of Europe’s prettiest cities. Originally founded as a Roman city, its medieval walls are the best preserved in the country. Its Roman Amphitheatre, with a capacity of 7000, is England’s largest whilst Chester Cathedral is the North West’s most visited attraction. The city has unique retail facilities with Chester’s Rows; double level covered shopping walkways on all four main streets. Chester Zoo is the UK’s largest zoo and is a great attraction for families. Pubs, bars and nightclubs are spread throughout the city, many housed within its iconic black-and-white medieval buildings. 

    Travel distances

    Site

    Chester

    Wrexham

    Liverpool

    Manchester

    Shotton

    Car: 27 min

    Car: 34 min

     

    Car: 39 min

    Train: 1h 4min

    Car: 1h

    Train: 1h 17min



    Transport

    Shotton Railway Station is situated where the Borderlands Line crosses the North Wales Coast Line. Arriva Trains Wales manages the services (click here to find out more).

    Chester train station has services to Wales (Llandudno, Holyhead, Cardiff) as well as Manchester, Liverpool, London and Milton Keynes.

    Property

    Shotton Sales
    Shotton Rentals

    Chester Sales
    Chester Rentals

    Wrexham Sales
    Wrexham Rental 

    Schools

    Deeside schools
    Cheshire West and Chester schools
    Wrexham schools

    East Midlands

    The East Midlands has long been a focal point for steel manufacturing. Even as far back as Roman times, the local area was mined for iron ore. Today, Tata has a site in Corby, near Northampton. The first steel was produced here in October 1935 and Corby has been known for steel production ever since.

    Corby

    Our Corby site manufactures a wide variety of steel tubes. The site is one of Europe's leading manufacturers of hot finished, cold formed welded steel tubular products, structural hollow sections, large diameter pipe and many more.

    The town itself is perfectly positioned, right in the heart of England. The surrounding area is known as Rockingham Forest which was originally a Royal Hunting Ground. So it is an area of greenery and natural beauty, along with a great sense of history and heritage. As well as the stately homes and manors that dot the local area, Corby itself dates back to the 8th Century. There is evidence of Roman, Anglo-Saxon and Danish settlements.

    Corby was often called the largest town in England not to have a railway station – but that tag no longer applies. Corby Train Station was officially opened in 2009 and trains run to London St. Pancras every hour. Within the town, the main centre has enjoyed major investment in recent years, transforming it into a bustling, modern shopping area.

    Corby sits in the centre of a triangle formed by Leicester, Peterborough and Northampton, while the nearest major city is Birmingham. Kettering, Market Harborough and Wellingborough are Corby’s closest neighbours, all of a similar size.

    Nearby places

    Slightly further away lies Northampton. Northampton is one of the largest towns in the UK, with a thriving sports and leisure scene. The local rugby union team is Northampton Saints, while the town also has a professional football team and a county cricket club. Silverstone Racing Circuit, current home of the British Grand Prix, is also just a few miles outside of the town. Northampton has enjoyed rapid expansion in recent decades, which has seen major redevelopments to the town centre and shopping areas.

    Travel further still and you will reach the city of Leicester. Leicester is one of the UK’s oldest cities and in the modern day, also one of the most diverse. It has two universities as well as established Asian, Polish, Ugandan, Somali and Irish communities. It is estimated that around 70 different languages are spoken in Leicester and it is thought that Diwali celebrations in the city are the largest outside of the Indian sub-continent.

    Travel distances

    Site

    Leicester

    Northampton

    Market Harborough

    Corby

    Car: 49 min

    Car: 43 min

    Car: 16 min


    Transport

    Trains run from Corby to London St. Pancras every hour, usually stopping at Kettering, Wellingborough, Bedford and Luton. You can also travel as far as Melton Mowbray in the other direction. Click here to find out more

    Property

    Corby Sales
    Corby Rentals

    Northampton Sales
    Northampton Rentals

    Leicester Sales
    Leicester Rentals

     

    Schools

    Corby schools
    Northamptonshire schools
    Leicester schools

    West Midlands

    Tata is growing and investing in the West Midlands.

    Our main site is in Wednesfield in Wolverhampton, where we have recently completed a series of investments to strengthen the site’s position as the UK’s largest steel processing centre. We also have sites in Walsall and Wednesbury. In each location, our aim is to create state-of-the-art, specialist sites where steel products can be produced in the optimum conditions. 

    University of Warwick, Coventry

    Our Research and Development function is located in the University of Warwick Science Park, in Coventry. Here we work closely with our customers and a global team of researchers to design and test new products and proceses, developing innovative solutions that meet the ever-changing demands of industry and technology.

    You’ll also discover that the thriving urban centre of Coventry is within easy reach. Home to both Coventry University and the University of Warwick it’s a busy and buzzing town centre with plenty of nightlife, retail and culture to enjoy. The Warwick Arts Centre found on the University of Warwick campus is the largest UK arts centre to be found outside of London. And the Belgrade Theatre, which benefitted from a recent refurbishment offers a diverse range of drama, dance and other live events. It’s a historic city, with no less than three cathedrals, including the world famous St Michael’s cathedral, which was constructed in the 1950s to replace the original building that had been destroyed in the bombing raids of World War II. Warwick Castle is a hugely popular tourist attraction and offers a great location for a day out, as does Kenilworth Castle, well known for its walks, Tudor gardens and various themed events. Other venues of historical interest include the Coventry Transport Museum, which is home to the largest collection of British transport in the world. Transport remains an important focus for Coventry and Warwickshire and it’s estimated that 10% of all UK automotive jobs are located in the area. Key employers include Jaguar Land Rover, Aston Martin, Peugeot Citroen, Rolls Royce and BMW. And of course, Tata Steel. The regional economy places a great deal of value on research and development and on average each firm in Coventry and Warwickshire spends more than double on R & D compared to elsewhere in the UK.

    Wednesfield

    The Steelpark site in Wednesfield has 14,000 m2 of warehousing for stocking and processing black bar. It also boasts a heated high-bay warehouse and racking for over 2,300 product specifications and up to 5,000 tonnes of high-value bright bar. Tata makes bright bar at Wednesbury and produces narrow coated strip in Walsall.  The site is also home to a large Distribution centre, which has an Automotive Service Centre, Slitting Centre, Light Gauge and Profiling Centre and employs around 600 employees

    Wednesfield is located in Wolverhampton and is best known for its thriving market. Although it is a village with plenty of history, it is also a modern place to live and work. It now has a wide array of shopping and leisure facilities, although Wolverhampton itself remains the hub of commercial and retail activity in the area.

    Walsall

    Walsall has always been a manufacturing town. Over the years, it has been most famous for its leather-makers and it is also a place with lots of leisure activities. Walsall has two museums and an art gallery, along with many bars, clubs, theatres and outdoor activities.

    Wednesbury

    Our other site in the West Midlands is located in Wednesbury, which is near Walsall and Wolverhampton. All three sites are well-connected to transport and, at the heart of the UK, they offer lots of opportunity to explore the surrounding areas and further afield.

    Nearby places

    Travel through the West Midlands and you will reach Britain’s second largest city – Birmingham. More people live in Birmingham than any other British city outside of London and the city is now a major international centre for business and an important transport, retail and conferencing hub. It also boasts a busy international airport. Within Birmingham itself, there is a wealth of cultural opportunities. The city has its own Royal Symphony Orchestra, Royal Ballet and Repertory Theatre – as well as six universities adding to a city with an already diverse population. The diversity of Birmingham is perhaps best reflected in its food. Birmingham is famous as the place where the Balti dish originated. The Balti is now a world-renowned dish, although Birmingham is still recognised as its authentic home.

    The region known as the West Midlands is geographically diverse. It borders Wales in the West and includes Staffordshire in the North, which means that there are no less than five Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty within the region: the Cotswolds, the Wye Valley, the Shropshire Hills, the Malvern Hills and Cannock Chase. However, due to its industrial heritage, the area is still known colloquially as ‘The Black Country’ – despite its very varied landscape.

    Metalworking has been important here from as early as the 16th century. Around this time, the thickest seam of iron ore and coal in Great Britain was discovered. The seam was nine metres thick, and its discovery fuelled rapid growth and prosperity in the West Midlands and beyond. At the same time, the West Midlands is famous for more than simply industry. It is home to the world famous Cadbury brand, created in Bournville. Farther afield, you can reach Warwick and Stratford-Upon-Avon, both historic towns with plenty to offer visitors. 

    Travel distances

    Site

    Wolverhampton

    Birmingham

    Coventry

    Walsall

    Car: 24 mins

    Car: 21 mins

    Car: 50 mins

    Coventry

    Car: 1 h 15 mins

    Car: 52 mins

    Car: 0 mins

    Wednesfield

    Car: 10 mins

    Car: 26 mins

    Car: 55 mins

    Wednesbury

    Car: 21 mins

    Car: 23 min

    Car: 43 mins

     

    Transport

    Walsall All train services through Walsall are operated by London Midland.

    Wednesfield and Wednesbury do not have a train station. Arriva runs regular bus services run to: Wolverhampton and Birmingham.

    Canley station is the closest to the R&D offices in Coventry (University of Warwick Science Park) being just 15 minute walk away. Coventry station is a 20 minute drive away.

     

    Property

    Walsall Sales
    Walsall Rentals

    Coventry Sales
    Coventry Rentals

    Wednesfield Sales
    Wednesfield Rentals

    Wednesbury Sales
    Wednesbury Rentals

    Schools

    Walsall schools
    Coventry schools
    Wednesfield schools
    Wednesbury schools

    North East

    In 1850, a rich seam of iron ore was discovered in the hills around Middlesbrough. Many iron works were quickly established and, for a time, Middlesbrough was nicknamed ‘Ironopolis’ while the River Tees became ‘Steel River’. Times change, but steel manufacturing is still integral to the region’s economy and Tata has important sites in Teesside and Hartlepool. 

    Hartlepool

    Hartlepool sits on the North Sea coast andis home to part of our Tubes business, one of Europe's leading manufacturers of hot finished, cold formed welded steel tubular products, structural hollow sections, large diameter pipe and many more. Steel from Tubes has been used in a wide variety of products ranging from lampposts and signposts to the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff and St Pancras Station in London. Tubes products have also been used in a diverse array of countries throughout the world from the Pepsi Max Big One in Blackpool to Ulster University in Northern Ireland and the Skyplaza International Airport in Hong Kong. As a town, Hartlepool has benefitted from significant investment during the 1990s, creating new housing, revitalising the waterfront and building a new, attractive marina in place of the former harbour and industrial shipyards.

    The wider North East region is home to three large conurbations: Teesside, Wearside, and Tyneside. There are only three cities in the region; Newcastle upon Tyne is the largest city in the region with a population of just under 280,000 followed by Sunderland, both of which are located in the metropolitan county of Tyne and Wear. The city of Durham is the county town of County Durham. More broadly, the region offers lots of opportunities to discover the North of England, Scotland and it is also close to many parts of mainland Europe across the North Sea, including Holland, Belgium and Scandinavia.

    Nearby places

    Durham is a beautiful and historic city, located on the River Wear to the north of Darlington. Durham is well known for its Norman cathedral and 11th century castle, both designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986. The castle has been the home of Durham University since 1832.

    Since the mid-1980s Sunderland has undergone massive regeneration,particularly around the central business district and the river corridor. New business investment has increased prosperity and, as in Middlesbrough, former shipyards and quaysides have been transformed into luxury residential blocks, city centre commercial developments and leisure facilities, as well as a major marina development. More recently, the east-end of the city has seen the implementation of huge regeneration plans, with new cafes, bars, restaurants and landscaped gardens.

    Newcastle is one of the most vibrant cities in the UK, with a city centre admired as much for its architecture as for its night-life. Newcastle successfully blends picturesque, neoclassical architecture and mediaeval streets with technology, business and innovation. The UK's first biotechnology village, the "Centre for Life" is located in the city centre close to the Central Station, while the traditional quayside has been transformed and is now home to major cultural developments in Gateshead, including the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, the venue for the Turner Prize 2011, and the Norman Foster-designed The Sage Gateshead music centre. Around every corner in Newcastle, there is something new to discover.

    Travel distances

    Site

    Middlesbrough

    Sunderland

    Newcastle

    Hartlepool

    Car: 24 mins

    Car: 32 mins

    Car: 44 mins

     

    Transport

    Hartlepool train station sits between Newcastle and Middlesbrough and is also served by Northern Rail.

     

    Property

    Hartlepool Sales
    Hartlepool Rentals

     

    Schools

    Hartlepool schools


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    Rest of UK

    As well as our manufacturing sites throughout the UK, Tata Steel also has teams located in Glasgow and London. Glasgow is home to our Pensions function and Tata Group roles are based in our Millbank offices in London.